Frequently Asked Questions

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For the best in deep cleaning and certification, call 0800 999 6066 

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For the best in duct cleaning, call 0800 999 6066 

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”8px”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row height=”small”][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Frequently Asked Questions” heading_tag=”h1″][/ultimate_heading][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Commercial Kitchen Operations” heading_tag=”h3″][/ultimate_heading][vc_tta_accordion][vc_tta_section title=”Why do kitchen Extract Ducts need cleaning?”][vc_column_text]Kitchen Extract systems become coated with combustible materials such as fats, grease and soot that are given off during the cooking process. If these are not regularly removed with cleaning, then the risk of a fire increases as the amount of material deposited increases. Your insurance company will undoubtedly require you to demonstrate that you are managing this risk appropriately and that the extract system is cleaned by a company that is “fit for purpose”.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”How often should I clean my Commercial Kitchen Extract System?”][vc_column_text]The frequency with which you should have your kitchen extract system cleaned depends on how heavily it is used. Your insurance company will probably specify how frequently they require you to have the extract system cleaned, and they will base this on the HVCA’s TR/19 Best Practice guidelines. In practice, the AIB (Association of British Insurers) recommends that, depending on the usage load, an extract system in a commercial kitchen should be cleaned and certified anything from annually to monthly.

The HVCA’s TR/19 best practice guidance calls for regular specialist cleaning of Extract Systems based on usage. Section 7.35 shows the minimum recommended interval between specialist cleans to be as below;

Frequency of Cleaning
Heavy Use 12 – 16 hours per day – 3 monthly
Medium Use 6 – 12 hours per day – 6 monthly
Light Use 2 – 6 hours per day – 12 monthly

 

If unattended to, the consequences can be severe for not only the commercial operation but the individual responsible.

Beyond that there are the environmental and mechanical issues that can arise as a result of neglect incomplete cleaning.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”How do you go about cleaning a Kitchen Extract System?”][vc_column_text]

  1. Firstly, it it important to determine whether the canopy surface is made from Stainless Steel or Aluminium in order to apply the correct cleaning method and chemicals. A simple test with a magnet will confirm which material we are dealing with.
  2. The Grease Filters and any external louvres and cowling are removed for appropriate cleaning which may include dipping in a tank (a “diptank”) of degreasing solution.
  3. Next the inside of the canopy and the duct is inspected, and where there is excess grease, this may need to be scraped away before starting chemical cleaning (see item 5 below). In addition, if the duct is inaccessible, then it may be necessary to cut out access panels. If this is required it will have been agreed witht he client prior to work commencing.
  4. Where applicable, the fan is removed and dismantled for cleaning. Once removed, the fan is thoroughly degreased, rinsed and dried.
  5. Now the inside of the canopy and duct can be sprayed with the appropriate chemicals and left to work according to manufacturers’ specifications. The entire canopy structure is degreased, and the surrounding back panels, walls and ceiling areas are also thoroughly cleaned.
  6. These surfaces are now cleaned off with a steam vacuum (where possible) or alternatively a steam cleaner, scraper or cloth are used where access is more restricted.
  7. Drip trays and lips are also thoroughly cleaned.
  8. The fan unit is re-assembed and tested.
  9. Grease filters are removed from the diptank after the specified soak time, then steam cleaned and dried before being replaced.
  10. The outside of the canopy is cleaned and sanitised.
  11. Finally, all floors used for access, both inside and outside of the premises are cleaned.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”How do you perform a Kitchen Deep Clean?”][vc_column_text]To achieve a successful kitchen deep clean, it is important to go about the process in a logical and systematic way.

  1. Firstly, the various appliances need to be dismantled so that their components can be assembled for immersion in a “diptank”. A diptank is a vessel which is filled with hot water and a suitable degreaser for the job in hand. Components that can be removed for dipping include; grease filters, oven trays, range tops and rings, fryer pans, grill trays, dismantled fan units as well as other heavily soiled items.
  2. The components are immersed in the diptank, and timed according to the manufacturers’ guidelines.
  3. Prior to cleaning the kitchen itself, all electrical items are isolated and exposed switches covered with a waterproof tape of polythene cover.
  4. Some kitchen items will be best cleaned in an outside area. These are assembled and removed from the kitchen.
  5. Where possible, equipment is pulled out to ensure that thorough cleaning can be achieved both beneath and behind the equipment.
  6. The inside areas to be cleaned are now scraped of all excess grease using wire brushes or scrapers, prior to applying an appropriate cleaning solution to the surfaces. Once cleaned, all excess dirt and cleaning chemicals are cleaned off all surfaces.
  7. Walls and ceilings are normally steam cleaned with a steam vacuum appliance, before the equipment is returned into position.
  8. Cooking and preparation areas are sanitised.
  9. Floor areas are then thoroughly cleaned with use of a steam cleaner and wet vacuum.
  10. Finally, the premises are tidied up – all rubbish and debris is removed, outside areas tidied up. The client is invited to inspect the work and once satisfied sign a customer acceptance form. If we are responsible for locking up, then the site is made secure, and keys returned to the designated place.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”What Certificate(s) do I get for Kitchen & Extract / Duct Cleans?”][vc_column_text]Unfortunately, there are currently no universally standard certificates that can be issued in the UK for Kitchen or Extract and Duct cleaning as a guarantee of meeting a consistent standard (as you would get when you take a car for an M.O.T. test, for example).

However, there are number of well documented Standards and Best Practice Guides issues by reputable industry bodies such as the Heating and Ventilation Contractors Association (the HVCA), and members of the HVCA will be able to issue you written confirmation that they have performed a job in accordance with a particular standard, and this may well be in the form of a Certificate.

For example, With the introduction of the Fire Safety Order – the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order in 2005, it is now the owners and managers of premises who carry the full responsibility for ensuring the safety of building occupants – a role which before October 2006 was effectively carried out by the Fire Authorities by issuing Fire Certificates.

So, with an Extract System, any body with a staff or custom of more than five people has to, by law, complete a Fire Risk Assessment. A component part of that is a certificate to confirm that their Extract including the Duct has been cleaned by a company ‘fit for purpose’. The term ‘fit for purpose’ is now interpreted as at the very least requiring that the cleaning company should be an HVCA member that adheres to the TR/19 standards. To be a member of the HVCA a company has to have been trading for at least three years and pass an independent audit for methods and systems.

Similarly, following other types of cleaning, such as a Kitchen Deep Clean, the cleaning company may issue a certificate stating that the work has been done and saying how long it is valid for, and against which standards the cleaning has been completed. However, as mentioned above, there is currently no single universal standard for this certification.

To conclude, in the absence of proper standardisation, you are best advised to find a cleaning company with a good track record who is a member of a reputable trade organisation such as the HVCA, and who will give a written certificate to confirm that the work they have undertaken follows the most appropriate standards and guidelines. The chances are that your insurance company will require this anyway.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Why should I have Splashbacks?”][vc_column_text]Some local authorities no longer permit the use of ceramic tiles to the rear of the cookline as these may crack and provide an area for grease ingress as well as a potential harbour of vermin and bacteria.

Stainless steel splashbacks provide an ideal wall covering within food preparation areas where washable surfaces are not only essential but also a pre-requisite of UK health regulations. A properly manufactured and installed stainless steel splashback is extremely easy to keep clean, durable and provides an attractive finish to the kitchen.

Splashbacks should be manufactured from folded and braced stainless steel sheet and the structure behind should be of a suitably fire rated material. The splash-backs should start at approximately 100mm above the floor level, the exact distance is subject to the depth of the floor coving, and should extend up to ceiling level or, up to the underside of a kitchen canopy, where installed. Visible fixings should be kept to the minimum and, where possible, avoided altogether. Openings for electrical or mechanical services may be cut into the splashback to agreed positions. Once installed, gaps between the panels and the building structure should be fully sealed with food grade silicon sealant.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Why have a Services Distribution Unit?”][vc_column_text]Services distribution units, otherwise known as SDU’s are a means of distributing electrical and mechanical services in a covered sealed void from the point of entry in to the kitchen space, to the range of cooking equipment.

SDU’s are ideal for separating and enclosing mechanical and electrical services in a stainless steel housing which is aesthetically pleasing. Mechanical and electrical services can be provided to the cooking equipment with ease as they can be designed to accommodate services entry points from high or low levels. From an installation point of view SDU’s are ideal because they can minimise co- ordination problems on site, especially if the services are integrally fitted in the factory prior to delivery. From a health and safety aspect, they provide easily cleanable surfaces and easier access between cooking equipment, minimising collection of dirt and grease between or behind the cooking appliances.

They can be also be used to house local an electrical distribution board and components of fire suppression systems.

SDU’s can come in a variety of shapes and forms, but normally comprise two vertical columns known as risers and a horizontal run known as a spine running between them. One riser should house the electrical services, while the other should house the mechanical services. Likewise the spines normally consist of two compartments, one for the electrical and the other for the mechanical services runs. The top section of the spine is usually reserved for the electrical services and the lower one for the mechanical services.

SDU’s should be configured to suit site constraints and service entry points as well as the equipment layouts. The majority of the SDU’s are specified to be fitted to house the electrical and mechanical services where the kitchen appliances are set out in an island configuration, however occasionally they may be required to serve wall mounted ranges.

The most common configuration is the rugby goal post type, ‘H’ shape, where the services entry point is from high level, followed by the football goal post type, inverted ‘U’ shape, where the services entry points are from ground level.

The SDU’s can also be designed to have both services risers on one end and a supporting leg on the other. Individual risers are also sometimes required to house either the mechanical or electrical services or both.

SDU’s should be manufactured from folded and welded type 304 grade stainless steel. If joints are required in the horizontal spines, they should be formed with internal standing seam joints and fitted with stainless steel nuts and bolts. External seams should be sealed with food grade sealant.

The horizontal spine should have a removable lid for access to the electrical compartment fitted with cable trays for installation of electrical wiring. The mechanical services compartment should be fitted with pipework support grid to provide support for the mechanical services. (ie: Gas and water pipes.)

Access panels, screw fixed, should be provided to gain access to the risers and spines as per customer requirements. One hinged access door with quick release latches should be fitted on the mechanical riser to gain access to the gas shut-off valve for maintenance purposes.

Services risers should be provided with adjustable telescopic feet to allow for any discrepancy in floor to ceiling heights or the canopy mounting height as well as uneven floor finish. In cases where services are required to be fitted out; these should be carried out in the factory to save time and problems on site. Competent persons or a specialist company must be employed to carry out the gas and electrical work to comply with the relevant regulations.

In accordance with BS7671, electrical and mechanical services must be separated and must be water tight. In cases where fitting of mechanical services within the electrical spine or riser is unavoidable, special enclosures must be fitted to completely separate the services.

For riser compartments containing gas services, ventilation grilles should be installed both at high and low level in order to prevent any potential gas build-up.

If service distribution units are fitted out ‘Knock off’ buttons should be positioned, at both ends, in an accessible position near the exit from the catering areas including the risers. This is to comply with DW/172 and BS6173:2001.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Should Kitchen Extract Systems be treated as LEV (Local Exhaust Ventilation)?”][vc_column_text]In a letter dated 5th July 2010, from Simon Brownlee, Policy Advisor / Environmental Health Officer at the HSE to Mr Gareth Keller, at the Heating and Ventilation Contractors’ Association, Mr Browlee wrote:

Thank you for your letter of 7 April 2010 asking for clarification as to whether kitchen extract systems are LEV. Those operating kitchens have a duty under the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) 2002 to ensure that an assessment of the risks to the health of their employees from exposure to hazardous substances is carried out and that exposure is either prevented or, where this is not reasonably practicable, controlled.

The control measures adopted should be based on the results of the risk assessment and be adequate to control exposure. The COSHH regulations set out a hierarchy of control measures. With regard to airborne contaminants these measures range from totally enclosed processes to the provision of general ventilation. In practice a combination of measures will usually be adopted to effectively control exposure.

It is the view of HSE that kitchen-extract systems are general-purpose work equipment with a number of functions. The objectives of adequate ventilation of kitchens are described in Catering Information Sheet 10(rev 1) Ventilation of kitchens in catering establishments’, as including; removing cooking fumes, removing excess hot air; introducing incoming cool clean air; workplace comfort; and providing sufficient air for complete combustion at appliances to prevent the risk of carbon monoxide accumulating.

Whilst these systems can contribute to removal of airborne contaminants they are not designed as LEV and therefore there is no requirement for thorough examination and testing under the COSHH regulations. Duty holders should however ensure that kitchen extract systems are maintained to ensure their effectiveness.

HSE has conducted research into the presence of carcrnogens in cooking fumes. This research shows that small quantities of carcinogens can be found in certain cooking fumes, however further HSE research into levels of ill health concluded that the limited available epidemiological evidence suggested no increased risk of cancer from cooking fumes (in particular lung cancer) among staff in catering kitchens in the UK compared with the population as a whole. Consequently it is HSE’s view that installation of local exhaust ventilation in kitchens would be disproportionate to the low risk of exposure to these contaminants.

Yours sincerely
Simon Brownlee[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][/vc_tta_accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”bg_color” bg_color_value=”#eeeeee”][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Fire Safety & Regulations” heading_tag=”h3″][/ultimate_heading][vc_tta_accordion][vc_tta_section title=” What is the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005?”][vc_column_text]The Order, made under the Regulatory Reform Act 2001 has replaced over 70 separate pieces of fire safety legislation, such as the Fire Precautions Act, Licensing Act and Housing Acts with a simple, single Order. It has abolished the requirement for certain premises to hold a fire certificate and instead requires any person who exercises some level of control in any non-domestic premises to take reasonable steps to reduce the risk from fire and ensure occupants can escape safely if a fire does occur.

This change does have its benefits: as well as simplification, the Order provides for better regulation by reducing the number of enforcing authorities that businesses have to deal and ensuring that regulation is carried out on the basis of risk and in a manner more suited to the needs of modern business and commerce.

In many non-domestic premises achieving fire safety will be a matter of common sense but as a ‘responsible person’ you will have to ensure that sufficient time is put aside to work through the necessary steps. In more complicated premises or those with a high life risk more expert help may be required. Specialist commercial cleaning companies, such as ourselves, will have a very grasp of some of the issues you will face in a commercial kitchen environment, and will generally be pleased to share their experiences and offer guidance. For example, please feel free to call us on 0800 999 6066 if you have any questions relating to how the Order applies to your particular situation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=” Where does the Fire Safety Order apply?”][vc_column_text]The Order applies to virtually all premises and covers nearly every type of building, structure and open space.

For example, any premises that offer catering are almost certainly included, such as:

  • Premises that provide care
  • Community halls
  • Pubs, clubs and restaurants
  • Schools
  • Tents and marquees
  • Hotels, B&Bs, guest houses, hostels and self catering accommodation
  • Factories and warehouses

To be clear, however, the Order does not however apply to individual, domestic premises occupied by a single family group.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”What are the main requirements of the Order?”][vc_column_text]The responsible person is required to:

  • Carry out a fire risk assessment identifying the risks and hazards.
  • Consider who may be especially at risk.
  • Eliminate or reduce the risk from fire as far as is reasonably practical and provide general fire precautions to deal with any residual risk. In a Commercial Kitchen Environment, regular cleaning to prevent the build up of combustible impurities will be a key consideration.
  • Take additional measures to ensure fire safety where flammable or explosive materials are used or stored.
  • Create a plan to deal with any emergency and, in most cases, document your findings.
  • Review the findings as necessary

In carrying out a risk assessment the responsible person may decide that given the nature of the premises or the people involved, they do not have the necessary competence to discharge their duties. If this is the case, the responsible person can choose to appoint one or more competent persons to assist them. The level of necessary competence is not prescribed in the Order. It recognises that the extent of competency will vary according to the nature and complexity of the premises involved.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Who is responsible?”][vc_column_text]Under the Order, anyone who has control in a building or anyone who has a degree of control over certain areas or systems may be designated a “responsible person” for example:

  • The employer for those parts of premises they have any control over.
  • The managing agent or owner for common parts of a premises or common fire safety equipment such as fire warning systems or sprinklers.
  • Any other person who has some control over a part of a premises may be the responsible person in so far as that control extends.

Although in many premises the responsible person will be obvious, there may be occasions when a number of people have some responsibility.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”How do I comply with the Fire Safety Legislation?”][vc_column_text]If you are the responsible person you must ensure a fire risk assessment is carried out.

Although you can choose to appoint one or more competent persons to assist you, you will remain responsible, in law, for complying with the Order.

The level of necessary competence is not prescribed in the Order. It recognises that the extent of competency will vary according to the nature and complexity of the premises involved.

The responsible person, either on their own or in co-operation with any other responsible person must as far as is reasonably practical, ensure that everyone on the premises can escape safely in the event of a fire.

This differs from previous legislation in that there is no longer any distinction made between people who are employees, for example in a place of work and members of the public at an open air entertainment venue. It includes people who may have a disability or anyone who may need special assistance. The Order requires that the responsible person takes ownership of the management of any risk in their premises. Fire certificates have been abolished and those previously issued no longer have legal status. You will therefore need to carry out a fire risk assessment and ensure that your risk reduction, fire precautions and maintenance routines are sustained.

To help you ensure your premises comply with the new legislation, the CLG website contains information on how to comply with the requirements of the Order. The ‘Short Guide to Making Your Premises Safe From Fire’ provides a useful introduction to the principles of fire safety (and includes the 5-step risk assessment checklist) and more detailed technical guidance, designed to help you consider how best to comply with the legislation in a range of specific types of premises, is also available to help you consider how best you can comply.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”How do I complete a Fire Safety risk assessment?”][vc_column_text]Below is a summary of the 5 steps you will need to go through to carry out a fire risk assessment within your premises:

Note: When assessing Catering Extract Ventilation BSRIA have produced a very useful set of guidelines on behalf of the Association of British Insurers (ABI).

 

Step 1 – Identify fire hazards

  • Sources of ignition
  • Sources of fuel

Step 2 – Identify people especially at risk

  • Members of staff
  • People not familiar with the premises
  • People working alone

Step 3 – Evaluate, remove, reduce and protect from risks

  • Measures to prevent fires
  • Measures to protect people from fire

Step 4 – Record, plan, instruct, inform and train

  • Record significant findings and actions taken
  • Prepare an emergency plan
  • Inform relevant people, provide instruction, co-operate and co-ordinate with others
  • Provide training

Step 5 – Review

  • Keep assessment under review
  • Revise where necessary

The Fire Safety Advice Centre has some useful guidance including a risk assessment template and advice about how to evaluate risk based on potential severity and also the likelihood of an event occurring.

In addition, an online self-assessment form is available from the Fire Gateway site to enable you to test the extent to which your completed risk assessment is likely to comply with the requirements of the Order. This consists of a series of fire-safety related questions which should take no more than ten minutes to complete. At the end of the process, you will have the option to view your results and any suggestions for improvement that may be applicable by means of an online form which you can print or save for future reference.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][/vc_tta_accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Air Ducts and Ventilation Systems” heading_tag=”h3″][/ultimate_heading][vc_tta_accordion][vc_tta_section title=” What is General Ventilation?”][vc_column_text]General Ventilation (or dilution ventilation) is a term used to define the flow of air into and out of a working area, for example and office space, so that any contaminants are diluted by adding some fresh air. This can be provided by:

  • Natural ventilation which relies on wind pressure and temperature differences to move fresh air through a building and is usually not fully controllable.
  • Forced or mechanical ventilation which uses mechanical supply and/or extraction to provide fresh air and is controllable.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=” Why is Fresh Air Required in the Workplace?”][vc_column_text]You need to provide fresh air to:

  • provide oxygen for breathing in and to remove carbon dioxide from breathing out;
  • remove excess heat or, if conditioned, provide heat (e.g. in winter) and keep a comfortable temperature;
  • dilute and remove body and other types of odours (e.g. food); and
  • dilute any contaminants caused by workplace activities (i.e. the use of dilution ventilation following a risk assessment).

Insufficient fresh air may lead to tiredness, lethargy, headaches, dry or itchy skin and eye irritation in your employees. These symptoms may also be produced whilst working in poorly designed buildings and offices and when there are unsatisfactory working conditions. The symptoms are generally worse in buildings where there is not enough fresh air, or where the fresh air supply may come into contact with contaminants in the air supply system. These are common symptoms of what is generally known as sick building syndrome.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”When do I need to Clean my Ventilation System?”][vc_column_text]The Approved Code of Practice to Regulation 6 of the Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) regulations 1992 requires that any mechanical ventilation systems, including air conditioning systems, which you use to provide fresh air should be regularly and properly cleaned, tested and maintained to make sure they are kept clean and free from anything which may contaminate the air and cause health problems.

As a general rule, if you run your finger along the opening of a duct and it collects dust then it probably needs cleaning. Organisations such as the Heating and Ventilation Contractors Association (HVCA) and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) provide information on testing for likely contaminants in ductwork and on cleaning. As an HVCA member, Pro-Duct Clean Ltd can also provide you with impartial advice and guidance.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Is it Necessary to Clean New Ductwork Before Use?”][vc_column_text]Building sites are dusty, dirty places so it is very difficult to prevent any new installation of ductwork from becoming contaminated with the likes of brick, cement and plaster dusts, never mind mineral fibres, forgotten sandwiches and hard hats!

Capping-off the ducts is often used as a potential solution, but even then it is not necessarily fool-proof – and it does add significant additional expense. It is practically impossible to keep ductwork clean by ‘capping off’; partly because you have to have the system open in order to erect new duct sections, and that is during the busy, dusty, daytime site working periods. What is more: site people have a strange desire to ‘pop’ the covers!

The HVCA Guide to Good Practice TR19: ‘Cleanliness of Ventilation Systems’, aims to provide some clarity.

Firstly, the specifier’s need to decide what they want and specify it clearly. Three levels of protection listed in TR19. The third, highest level requires cleaning by a specialist contractor after installation. Given that it is practically impossible to keep ductwork clean by ‘capping off’, if you want to operate a clean system, then in reality the only objective choice is to specify cleaning.

Secondly, it is important to be clear as to the appropriate measure of cleanliness level for new systems. It is more appropriate to specify against the Post-Clean verification level (0.075g/m2) than using the Surface Deposit Limits ( 6g/m2 for extracts and 1g/m2 for supply and recirculation ducts), since the latter (Surface Deposit Limit) is really a measure of dirtiness, i.e. a ‘trigger’ level designed to advise when an existing system in use, has become so dirty that it should be cleaned.

So, clearly if you are starting off a new system, you really do need to do a thorough job in minimising the potential for adverse reaction from the new occupants (especially when combined with a cocktail of VOC’s off-gassing from adhesives, coatings and other components) is immense, and experienced often enough. You can imagine the frustration of the Facility Manager who has just spent a fortune on building/renting/moving into new premises!

To summarise, the advantages in accepting from the outset of a new build that the system will be professionally cleaned before being brought into use include;

  • You can verify and fine-tune the access system for cleaning
  • You can save a fortune by dispensing with excessive capping off
  • Most importantly in practice, it gives the project people certainty: if a specifier ducks the issue and simply says ‘install the ductwork cleanly’, without measurable post-clean verification limits to achieve, then who decides what is clean? It’s a recipe for under-cutting at tender stage, and conflict throughout the construction and handover stages

[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”How Can I specify the Service I Require from a Ventilation Cleaning Company?”][vc_column_text]For most of us, setting up a robust, yet appropriate specification for a specialist service such as cleaning and maintenance of an air conditioning or ventilation hygiene system from scratch would be a considerable challenge.

Fortunately, the Building Services Research and Information Association (BSRIA) has written a Standard Specification of Ventilation Hygiene, which is intended to provide the basis for a ventilation hygiene contract between a Client and a Contractor.

You can order a copy of the specification and accompanying Guidance directly from the BSRIA bookshop.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”What Certificate(s) do I get for Air Duct Cleans?”][vc_column_text]Unfortunately, there are currently no universally standard certificates that can be issued in the UK for Air Duct cleaning as a guarantee of meeting a consistent standard (as you would get when you take a car for an M.O.T. test, for example).

However, there are number of well documented Standards and Best Practice Guides issues by reputable industry bodies such as the Heating and Ventilation Contractors Association (the HVCA), and members of the HVCA will be able to issue you written confirmation that they have performed a job in accordance with a particular standard, and this may well be in the form of a Certificate.

For example, With the introduction of the Fire Safety Order – the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order in 2005, it is now the owners and managers of premises who carry the full responsibility for ensuring the safety of building occupants – a role which before October 2006 was effectively carried out by the Fire Authorities by issuing Fire Certificates.

So, with an Extract System, any body with a staff or custom of more than five people has to, by law, complete a Fire Risk Assessment. A component part of that is a certificate to confirm that their Extract including the Duct has been cleaned by a company ‘fit for purpose’. The term ‘fit for purpose’ is now interpreted as at the very least requiring that the cleaning company should be an HVCA member that adheres to the TR/19 standards. To be a member of the HVCA a company has to have been trading for at least three years and pass an independent audit for methods and systems.

Similarly, following other types of cleaning, such as an Air Duct Deep Clean, the cleaning company may issue a certificate stating that the work has been done and saying how long it is valid for, and against which standards the cleaning has been completed. However, as mentioned above, there is currently no single universal standard for this certification.

To conclude, in the absence of proper standardisation, you are best advised to find a cleaning company with a good track record who is a member of a reputable trade organisation such as the HVCA, and who will give a written certificate to confirm that the work they have undertaken follows the most appropriate standards and guidelines. The chances are that your insurance company will require this anyway.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][/vc_tta_accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row height=”small” bg_type=”bg_color” bg_color_value=”#a0a0a0″][vc_column][vc_column_text]

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Contact Us

The Gattinets, East Bergholt, Colchester, CO7 6QT

0800 999 6066

enquiries@pro-ductclean.com